Monthly Archives: September 2014

Container Terminal Management System and Internet of Things

Expected Use of IoT in Terminals

The industry is taking a growing interest in Internet of Things (IoT) that connects through a network all various objects used in daily life. If IoT is applied to container terminals, it is expected to facilitate the tracking of terminal equipment, thus improving efficiency in equipment operation and reducing operating costs.
  

Increasing interest in IoT from the industry

With the recent evolution of the Internet of Things, its scope of application is expanding from consumer electronics and auto to cover industrial facilities like heavy equipment. As prices go down for sensors or communications-ready modules, the installation cost has decreased, thus enabling the provision of differentiated services for customers.


Use of IoT as demonstrated by Komatsu

IoT is similar to the earlier concept of M2M (Machine to Machine) communication, and in a certain case, the current makeup of IoT was realized ten years ago and has since been in use. That’s Komatsu, a Japanese company supplying construction machinery such as excavators and bulldozers. The construction vehicles from the company are equipped with an assortment of sensors. And data created by the sensors is automatically sent through a communications satellite or a mobile network to a Komatsu server, where it is accumulated. With this, Komatsu can check the current condition of specific vehicles, verify their normal operation, and identify their locations through GPS.
 

Example of Using Internet of Things by Komatsu

Example of Using Internet of Things by Komatsu

Thus, the company has created a structure that ensures central control and data collection with regard to the distribution and condition of construction machines scattered around the globe.
By visualizing this data, Komatsu provides equipment purchasers with information needed for its maintenance, thus allowing it to figure out the causes of equipment malfunctions more easily. This has reduced the time for repairing equipment, which has in consequence reduced maintenance costs for customers. Moreover, with the company’s sales agents, it has created a basis for keeping appropriate inventory levels by precisely predicting demand for equipment and parts needed by customers in specific regions.
 

Expected Changes to Container Terminal Management System

Compared to the time when Komatsu adopted IoT, sensors or communications modules are now smaller and cheaper, thus easier to apply. If a terminal gets IoT, it becomes possible to use information on all movements of equipment in the terminal. And such information will contribute to clearing backup in the terminal and improving operational efficiency.
 

1. Figuring out and beating bottlenecks that lower productivity in a container terminal

Even a conventional terminal that lacks automation equipment can obtain information on manually operated equipment such as cranes and YT by attaching sensors on them. In the past, operators used their naked eyes to check the status of operation and employed communications devices to report results and occurrence of problems, but adoption of IoT will enable automatic obtainment of such information at the control tower. By accumulating and analyzing the gathered container-tracking information, the process can implement preventive measures on the points where errors frequently occur or productivity has been lowered, thus ensuring efficient and proactive operation of a terminal.

Sensing - Crane, YT Moving/Driving Speed
- Crane, YT Moving/Driving distance
- Turn Time Breakdown(Waiting/empty driving/Loaded driving etc)
 

2. Improving efficiency and reducing maintenance cost through optimized equipment management

Information acquired through the sensors installed on equipment that may be used in terminal operation includes specific data collected from different units of equipment. When one learns fuel consumption, check period alert, and actual operating time, one can create a work plan and issue a work order that each reflect the information with a view to ensuring efficient terminal operation.

Sensing - Fuel consumption
- Maintenance reminders
- Actual working hours                                                         

 

Things to Consider when Adopting IoT in Container Yard Management System

There are terminals that have various sensors installed on the STS container crane, ASC, and yard equipment. Especially, automated terminals, compared to ordinary ones, run on a far larger number of sensors.

Frequently, however, data created through the sensors is managed only as a result of basic operation. In most cases, such data is used to manage individual units of equipment. There is no organic process that places an entire terminal in perspective for accumulation and management of the data, which is not exploited in the way of optimizing the entire terminal.
So, a container-tracking system, which allows sensors to collect data on the movement of the gates, yard tractors, yard cranes, and STS container cranes and ensures its analysis through optimization tools, it will facilitate terminal optimization.

 

Posted by Ho-seok Lee, a general manger, who has developed business plans and sales strategy in technology business. Be sure to follow me on Linkedin.

 

If you want to learn more about container yard management system, see the related posts below.

 
Have something to say about IoT and its expected use in terminals? Leave a comment below! 

 

Automated Container Terminal as Top Terminal Worldwide: Jebel Ali Port CT #3

How are top container terminals worldwide working? Jebel Ali terminal was ranked as one of top 10 container terminals based on port productivity in 2013.

And here is an interesting video showing the operation of Container Terminal #3 at Jebel Ali Port. This terminal commenced its operations in 2014.


*Source: DP World
 
As you can see on the video above, this Container Terminal #3 at Jebel Ali Port is an automated containter terminal. It implemented CyberLogitec’s terminal operating system called OPUS Terminal but also Eagle Eye terminal automation system solution.
 
Do you want to know more about the software solutions? Find out information about our Eagle Eye solution here and contact us.

CyberLogitec’s CSR: Cultural Exchange with Vietnamese Student and More

‘Just do IT’, CLT Dreamers’ 6th story(2)
 
 Cultural Exchange
- Stepping closer, gamboling, and sharing
 
 While visiting Nguyen Anh Thu Middle School and Luong The Vinh Middle School, the participants spent time on ‘Just Do IT!’ in the morning and had a good time enjoying cultural exchange with local students of ‘Just Do IT!’, playing together. Day 1, with the topic of ‘Stepping closer,’ had Chilgyo game and painting, and Day 2 themed to ‘Gamboling’ provided a batch of games enjoyed in Korea such as jegichagi, folding, tailing, rolling, bouncing, and carrying over. Day 3 with the topic of ‘Sharing’ proceeded with science classes, flying moth glider and building a top by connecting marshmallow with pasta noodle within a given period of time. 
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team in Vietnam

We Enjoyed a few Games Together!

In painting session, students used hands, legs, spoons, and cotton swabs to paint images that would symbolize Vietnam. One team created a picture in which a water buffalo was virtually walking out of a bamboo forest. Besides, the students depicted beautiful lotus flowers of Vietnam, the traditional costume of ao dai, and scenes of Tet, the Vietnamese New Year, while telling Dreamers a lot about the country.
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team in Vietnam

Dreamers Volunteers at Painting Session

After the painting session, the faces of Dreamers volunteers turned into canvas thanks to the leftover paints, adding big laughter to the shared time.
Cyberlogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team in Vietnam

Dreamers Volunteers at Pinting Session

The dance prepared by Dreamers was hot, confirming the Korean Wave sweeping Vietnam.
 
Cyberlogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team in Vietnam

Korean Pop Dance prepared by Dreamers Volunteers

Sharing Love
On the last day in Vietnam, the middle-school students delivered a surprise gift by visiting by bus where the volunteers were staying, which touched the hearts of Dreamers members. After Dreamers returned to Korea, those students have sent to the members video letters, which they created using the editing skills they learned through IT education. Everyone was happy through the ten days because we were together.
 
We have our fingers crossed that the little flutter of the wing of Dreamers would grow into sharing of warm love with others and corporate social responsibility, thus having good influence on the entire world.
 
Cyberlogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team in Vietnam
Cyberlogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team in Vietnam

CLT Dreamers 6th Members with Vietnamese Students

Dreamers 6th
Members Hyun Seok HA | Min Gyung CHO | Hee Kyung KIM | Geun Woong HAN | Yoon Ji JO | Young Jae JANG | Chan Hee NA | Hong Won SEOL | Kyung Ryul KIM
Staff Min Taek HWANG Kyung | Wan CHO | Min Jung KIM | Jong Won LEE
Interpreters Mac Thi Kim Chi | Mai Huệ | Phương Nghi

  
 
Do you like to hear more stories of CLT Dreamers 6th? Click here to learn more about them.

CyberLogitec’s Corporate Social Responsibility: CLT Dreamers to Vietnam

‘Just do IT’, CLT Dreamers’ 6th story(1)

CLT Dreamers Global Youth Volunteers
July 30, 2014 ~ August 08, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
 
CLT Dreamers is an international IT (Information Technology) volunteer work group that CyberLogitec sends out year after year with a view to supporting IT education for students in developing countries and expanding cultural exchange. With their passions as hot as the August sun, CLT Dreamers, in its 6th term, have been to their volunteer work in Vietnam for 10 days.
  
CLT Dreamers, Cyberlogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team

CLT Dreamers 6th Members

  
Total fourteen members including nine college students, CyberLogitec employees, and a volunteering Vietnamese translator, worked under the slogan of ‘Just do IT!’ in thoroughly preparing for the mission. College student members voluntarily worked in planning the program and organizing specific contents for it, while demonstrating such subtlety and meticulousness as to get Plan B lined up as well.
 
CLT Dreamers, Cyberlogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team

Ties to Vietnam
With its 1st term started in 2009 and now coming into its sixth year, CLT Dreamers’ activities have drawn spotlight from the media in the local community of Ho Chi Minh, as both sides work together to share special memories each year.
 
CLT Dreamers, CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team

 
Volunteering in IT Education and Cultural Exchange
 
Sharing IT knowledge with FPT University
The volunteers visited FPT University, a local IT junior college, and following a campus tour, made presentations and follow-up questions in English on the technological trends in both countries. The Vietnamese students prepared a presentation on ‘Sensor Technology’ in which they provided a detailed description of the technology for mechanical conversion of the human senses by detecting and distinguishing physical changes and also demonstrated it. The members of the 6th-term Dreamers presented technology on the two topics of ‘Wearable Devices and 3D Printing’. In the presentation, the members shared with the local students a piece rendered with 3D printer based on the design that one member had carried out before they traveled to Vietnam. With their curiosity awakened, the students of FPT University showed strong interest in the demonstration.
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team (3)

CLT Dreamers Visited FPT University

Following the seminar presentations, everyone enjoyed a demonstration match in Vovinam, the traditional martial art of Vietnam that the FTP students prepared. And participants learned a cute dance called ‘chicken dance’ and had a good time, gamboling around hand in hand with everyone. In the last part of the event, everyone put on the T-shirt created by Dreamers and posed for photography, delightfully greeting one another like old friends.
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team (3)

We Created ‘Chicken dance’ Together

Volunteering in Education
Dreamers visited Nguyen Anh Thu Middle School and Luong The Vinh Middle School in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, and donated computers, speakers and accessories to the school. Designed to get the local students familiar with IT environment through teaching them how to create practical media content and encouraging them to perform projects by themselves, the curriculum included image editing on day 1, video shooting and editing on day 2, and PowerPoint class and presentations.
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team (3)

CLT Dreamers Visited Nguyen Anh Thu Middle School and Luong The Vinh Middle School

While uploading, editing, and merging the taken photos, participants took the role of a famous soccer player, their favorite cartoon characters, or a beautiful entertainment star.
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team
 
Through the program, Dreamers coordinated the overall training time and schedule while members made sure that no student was left behind. Shy at first, the students opened up their heart and stepped closer to the members. As for the creation of the video titled ‘High School Jam’, the product carried the students’ artistic flair and talents. While watching the created video, everyone was very happy.
 
[Video] Bad Student – Nguyen Anh Thu jam 
 
 
[Video] 
LTV SCHOOL JAM – by luong the vihn school
 
 
 
CyberLogitec's Corporate Social Responsibility volunteer team
 
Dreamers 6th 
Members Hyun Seok HA | Min Gyung CHO | Hee Kyung KIM | Geun Woong HAN | Yoon Ji JO | Young Jae JANG | Chan Hee NA | Hong Won SEOL | Kyung Ryul KIM
Staff Min Taek HWANG Kyung | Wan CHO | Min Jung KIM | Jong Won LEE
Interpreters Mac Thi Kim Chi | Mai Huệ | Phương Nghi

 
Next: CyberLogitec’s CSR: Cultural Exchange with Vietnamese Student and More

Do you like to hear more stories of CLT Dreamers 6th? Click here to learn more about them.

Procedures of Customs Clearance: 10+2 Rule for the ISF Importers

Global Customs Trends
– Importer Security Filing and Additional Carrier Requirements (10+2 Rule)

1. 10+2 Rule

On January 26, 2009, the new rule titled Importer Security Filing and Additional Carrier Requirements (commonly known as “10+2”) went into effect. This new rule applies to import cargo arriving to the United States by vessel. Failure to comply with the new rule could ultimately result in monetary penalties, increased inspections, and delay of cargo. The information submitted in Importer Security Filing improves the ability of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to identify high-risk shipments with a view to preventing smuggling and ensuring cargo safety and security.
 
Under the 10+2 rule, before merchandise arriving by vessel can be imported into the United States, the “Importer Security Filing (ISF) Importer,” or their agent (e.g., licensed customs broker), must electronically submit certain advance cargo information to CBP in the form of an Importer Security Filing, which consists of as many as 10 importer data elements (the “10” part of the 10+2 rule). This requirement only applies to cargo arriving in the United States by ocean vessel; it does not apply to cargo arriving by other modes of transportation. And the 10+2 rule states that carriers must submit Additional Carrier Requirements, which consists of vessel stow plans and container status messages (the “2” part of the 10+2 rule).
 

2. Importer Security Filing (ISF)

(1) Who is Responsible for the Filing?

The ISF Importer is required to submit the Importer Security Filing. The ISF Importer is the party causing the goods to arrive within the limits of a port in the United States by vessel. Typically, the ISF Importer is the goods’ owner, purchaser, consignee, or agent such as a licensed customs broker. For foreign cargo remaining on board (FROB), however, the ISF Importer is the carrier. For immediate exportation (IE) and transportation and exportation (T&E) in-bond shipments, and goods to be delivered to a foreign trade zone (FTZ), the ISF Importer is the party filing the IE, T&E, or FTZ documentation.

 
(2) What Must Be Filed?

 a. Shipments Consisting of Goods Intended to be Entered into the United States and Goods Intended to be Delivered to a Foreign Trade Zone

ISF Importers, or their agent, must provide eight data elements, no later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard a vessel destined to the United States. Those data elements include:

① Seller name and address – last named overseas seller/address on the transaction invoice/purchase order.
② Buyer name and address – last named buyer and address 24 hours prior to foreign lading.
③ Importer of Record Number – unique identifying number of the entity primarily responsible for the payment of any duties on the merchandise or an authorized agent acting on his behalf. The unique identifying number can be the IRS, EIN, SSN or CBP-assigned number.
④ Consignee Number – unique identifying number of the entity to which the goods are to be consigned. Typically, the consignee is the “deliver to” party at the end of the supply chain who has a fiduciary interest in the cargo. The unique identifying number can be the IRS, EIN, SSN or CBP-assigned number.
⑤ Manufacturer name and address – name and address of the entity that last manufactures, produces or grows the imported commodity.
⑥ Ship to name and address – named party and the address on the transaction that will physically receive the merchandise, which may be different from the consignee.
⑦ Country of Origin – country in which the goods are wholly obtained or produced.
⑧ HTSUS number (six-digit level) – the initial classification required of a shipment prior to entry being filed.

And two additional data elements must be submitted as early as possible, but no later than 24 hours prior to the ship’s arrival at a U.S. port. These data elements are:
 
⑨ Container Stuffing Location – Physical Foreign Location (street, city, country) where the goods are stuffed into the container prior to its closing.
⑩ Consolidator name and address – Foreign Party that physically stuffs the container prior to its receipt by the carrier for shipment to the U.S. The consolidator’s address identifies the physical location of the cargo, which may differ from the usual manufacturer or shipper premises.
 

b. FROB, IE Shipments, and T&E Shipments

For shipments consisting entirely of FROB and shipments consisting entirely of goods intended to be transported in-bond as an IE or T&E, the Importer Security Filing must consist of five elements. Importer Security Filing for IE and T&E shipments must be submitted no later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard a vessel destined to the United States and Importer Security Filing for FROB must be submitted any time prior to lading. The following five data elements must be submitted for FROB, IE and T&E shipments: ~ of FROB and IE, T&E shipments in <Table 1>.

<Table 1> Importer Security Filing

Shipment Type

Goods to be Entered into the United States

FROB

IE, T&E shipments

Goods to be delivered to an FTZ

Who

Goods’ owner, purchaser, consignee, or agent such as a licensed customs broker

Carrier Party filing the IE or T&E documentation Party filing the FTZ documentation

When

No later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard a vessel destined to the United States

Any time prior to lading No later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard a vessel destined to the United States No later than 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard a vessel destined to the United States

What

* Ten data elements
① Seller
② Buyer
③ Importer of record number / FTZ applicant identification number
④ Consignee number(s)
⑤ Manufacturer (or supplier)
⑥ Ship to party
⑦ Country of origin
⑧ Commodity HTSUS number
⑨ Container stuffing location
⑩ Consolidator FROB, IE Shipments, and T&E Shipments

 * Five data elements
① Booking party
② Foreign port of unlading
③ Place of delivery
④ Ship to party
⑤ Commodity HTSUS number

* Five data elements
① Booking party
② Foreign port of unlading
③ Place of delivery
④ Ship to party
⑤ Commodity HTSUS number
* Ten data elements
① Seller
② Buyer
③ Importer of record number / FTZ applicant identification number
④ Consignee number(s)
⑤ Manufacturer (or supplier)
⑥ Ship to party
⑦ Country of origin
⑧ Commodity HTSUS number
⑨ Container stuffing location
⑩ Consolidator FROB, IE Shipments, and T&E Shipments

 
 
3. Additional Carrier Requirements

In addition to submitting the cargo manifest information electronically to the CBP by way of its AMSs, the carrier is now required to electronically submit two additional data elements; a Vessel Stow Plan and Container Status Messages to the CBP for all containerized ocean vessel shipments inbound to the United States.
 

(1) Vessel Stow Plan

A Vessel Stow Plan must include information on the physical location of the cargo, in particular, dangerous goods and other high-risk containerized cargo, loaded onboard the vessel destined for the United States. The CBP must receive the vessel stow plan no later than 48 hours after the carrier departs from its last foreign port. If the voyage is less than 48 hours, the CBP must receive the vessel stow plan prior to the vessel’s arrival at its first U.S. port. The vessel stow plan must include standard information regarding the vessel and each container onboard the vessel. According to the CBP, the vessel operating carrier, not the NVOCC, is responsible for filing the vessel stow plan. For bulk and break-bulk carriers shipping part container cargo, the CBP requires the carrier to submit a vessel stow plan for all containerized cargo aboard the vessel.

(2) Container Status Messages

Container Status Messages (CSM) report container movements and changes in status, e.g., whether full or empty. If a carrier is currently creating or collects CSMs in an equipment tracking system, that carrier must submit CSMs to the CBP regarding certain events relating to all containers destined to arrive at a U.S. port by vessel. Carriers must submit CSMs electronically via the secure file transfer protocol no later than 24 hours after the message is entered into the carrier’s equipment tracking system. As with the Vessel Stow Plan, the CBP requires the vessel carrier, not the NVOCC, to submit CSMs.

<Table 2> Additional Carrier Requirements

Requirements

Vessel Stow Plan

Container Status Messages

When

No later than 48 hours after the departure of the vessel from the last foreign port, or prior to arrival at the first U.S. port for voyages less than 48 hours in duration.

If any of the required events occurs, when the carrier creates or collects a CSM in its equipment tracking system reporting that event.

What

 * Information regarding the Vessel
① Vessel Name & IMO Number
② Vessel Operator
③ Voyage Number

* Information regarding Each Container
① Container Operator
② Equipment Number
③ Size and Type
④ Stow Position
⑤ Hazmat-UN Code
⑥ Load port
⑦ Discharge port

 Equipment Number
 Event Description, Date, Time and Location
 Vessel

 

4. Enforcement

If the ISF is not filed, cargo will not move and in addition, CBP may issue liquidated damages of $5,000 per violation for the submission of an inaccurate, incomplete or untimely filing. If goods for which an ISF has not been filed arrive in the U.S., CBP may withhold the release or transfer of the cargo; CBP may refuse to grant a permit to unlade for the merchandise; and if such cargo is unladen without permission, it may be subject to seizure. Additionally, noncompliant cargo could be subjected to “Do Not Load” orders (DNLs) at origin or further inspection on arrival.

5. More Information

For more detailed information about the Importer Security Filing, visit the CBP website at
http://www.cbp.gov/border-security/ports-entry/cargo-security/importer-security-filing-102.

The website includes fact sheets, FAQs, and other public outreach sources. Additionally, questions may be sent to Security_Filing_General@cbp.dhs.gov.

 

Global Customs Trends Series:
(1) U.S. – Automated Manifest System (AMS)
(2) U.S. – Import Security Filing (ISF) Regulation
(3) Canada – Advance Commercial Information (ACI)
(4) China – China Customs Advance Manifest (CCAM) Regulation
(5) Europe – Entry Summary Declaration (ENS)
(6) Japan – Advanced Filing Rule (AFR)

Posted by Ki-Nam Kim, a solution specialist, who has researched and developed a business solution related to customs and logistics.

Have something to say about 10+2 rule of the US? Please leave a comment below.

How Container Terminal Operating System Measures Performance Effectively

Traditionally, container terminals have used crane productivity as a KPI for terminal productivity management. Lately, however, with vessels growing in size, shipping companies are strongly demanding vessel productivity improvement of terminals. And since terminals are working with their focus on improving vessel productivity, now the overall efficiency has downgraded with terminals, thus leading to earnings shortfall. When productivity improvement for an entire terminal should take considering not only berth productivity, but also yard and gate productivity, this hasn’t been done properly. To address the problem, terminals have deployed various methods to measure or analyze the efficiency of a terminal, but it is not so easy to find instances in which a company goes beyond focusing on simple productivity that refers to the number of containers handled by the hour and calculating and analyzing an overall performance of a container terminal.
 
A few terminals that have recently realized process automation calculate and manage a new KPI as container terminal performance measures, which is exemplified by the indicators related to yard tractor as shown below.
 
Productivity KPI
- Number of Fleet
- Yard Tractor Productivity
 
Efficiency KPI
- Driving Speed
- Driving Distance
- Turn Time Breakdown (waiting/empty driving/loaded driving/job execution etc)
- Fuel mileage
 
To be specific, it calculates the number of operational vehicles, travel distance, travel speed, and time required for different job steps, which are factors that influence the productivity of ship-to-shore (STS) container cranes in container terminal operation. These indicators are analyzed by type of container handling (e.g., loading/discharging/housekeeping, single/twin etc.) and are used to measure and manage the efficiency of a yard tractor. With this, a smaller number of yard tractors can be deployed while maintaining the productivity of STS container cranes, or the same number of yard tractors can be operated while registering higher productivity for STS cranes.
  
Like this, the previous type of terminal operating system alone cannot realize a stereoscopic management of terminal performance that takes into consideration the two aspects of productivity and efficiency. It’s because TOS cannot figure out accurate information related to the location and operation of equipment in a terminal. Therefore, a container terminal operating system must add to TOS such accurate devices and software as can track terminal vehicles and containers, along with know-how and tools that can manage and analyze the big data generated in the container tracking.
Eagle Eye, the container terminal operating system measuring performance effectively

Eagle Eye, the container terminal operating system measuring performance effectively

Posted by In-Chon Park, a Business Analyst who has investigated container terminal market for several years and conducted TOS projects recently.

 

Want to learn more to improve setting KPIs for container terminals? See related posts about the tool below.

Have something to say about setting KPIs for container terminal operation? or Do you want to know more about our software solutions? Leave a comment below. We’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

Container Terminal Automation Trend and Bulk Market Prospects in 2014

A visit to TOC Europe 2014 (a report)

CyberLogitec participated in TOC Europe, which was held in London in June. TOC is the largest exhibition in terminal and port industry, and CyberLogitec hasn’t skipped a year in attending the exhibition to keep tabs on the trends in the industry and present potential customers our solutions such as OPUS Terminal and Eagle Eye. Especially at this year’s TOC Europe, we were able to exchange opinions on a variety of topics through meetings with a number of terminal operators and equipment manufacturers who were interested in container terminal automation.

 

Cyberlogitec Participated in TOC Europe 2014

Cyberlogitec Participated in TOC Europe 2014

A large crowd flocked to Tech TOC for the interest about terminal automation, and many people also  gave much attention to  Bulk TOC Session, presented for the first time this year.
 
Equipment suppliers and terminal operators presented actual applications of automation and employed methods in Tech TOC. Notably, there was a prevailing consensus that for an efficient terminal design, consideration should be given to optimization of the entire supply chain that gets beyond a specific terminal and focuses on the intermodal operation. And as for container terminal automation, various initiatives and R&D projects were under way in not only hardware that taps into cranes and sensors in a terminal but also software such as management system and operational process.
 

Tech TOC crowded with Those Interested in Terminal Automation

Tech TOC crowded with Those Interested in Terminal Automation

Bulk TOC treated a variety of wide-ranging topics in bulk such as construction of a bulk terminal, response to dust, bulk operation system, and simulation. According to bulk market prospects disclosed by Drewry, its demand will grow at an annual average of 4%, while its supply will grow at an average of 5% until 2018.

Compared to Tech TOC and Bulk TOC, the main CSC Conference, which focused on policy and terminal operation, failed to draw much attention from participants, with its plain theme and lacking eye-catching contents.
 
I think that one single company that cut a brilliant figure in TOC Europe was Gaussin in the largest booth and with the presence of its key executives, which presented an assortment of equipment and demonstrated its operation.
 
Gaussin, presented an assortment of equipment and demonstrated its operation in TOC Euopre 2014

Gaussin, presented an assortment of equipment and demonstrated its operation in TOC Euopre 2014

I see a growing role for TOC as a venue for sharing specialized skills and technology.

 
 
Posted by Ho-Seok Lee, a general manger, who has developed business plans and sales strategy in technology business. Be sure to follow me on Linkedin.

Automated Container Terminal with Mobile Devices of Enhanced UX

Manned automation expands with larger vessels

According to an ECSA report, as compared to January 2005, January 2014 witnessed an increase of 72% in deadweight tonnage of EU controlled fleet and an increase of 74% in gross tonnage. Meanwhile, the number of vessels in possession increased by only 31%. And Oxford Economics commented that it was interpreted as “reflecting the trend towards larger ships”. Following the trend, terminals continue to put in efforts to raise the operational efficiency and ensure worker safety. Prompt and safe cargo handling for very large ships could be accomplished through the full automaton, which improves infrastructure and unloading system by adopting automation equipment such as automated cranes and unmanned vehicles. However, such a project accompanying huge investment is hard to implement except in large terminals with enormous cargo volume such as Maasvlakte1 and Maasvlakte2, which is going to open in November 2014, both in Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. For the same reason, most terminals give priority to a  Semi automated  system supported by men. Because it could minimize initial investment.
 

A Semi Automated System requires increased use of mobile devices and enhanced UX

Upgrading productivity in a semi automated system become possible when workers accurately receive job orders efficiently planned by TOS (Terminal Operating System), appropriately perform them, and provide timely feedback on them. In this process, industrial mobile devices serve as important media that enable effective control by setting up an efficient connection between specific areas of terminal operation and the control tower. Productivity increases as the devices enhance communication among the control tower operator and the vehicle/crane drivers etc.
 
The mobile devices used in terminals have a strict requirement, as they would have to deal with harsher conditions than they do in an ordinary environment. While providing necessary information, they must ensure easy, intuitive understanding, and also have to secure excellent visibility so that operators can quickly figure out delivered information in all outdoor environments. Now, a lot of consumer mobile devices are in the race to develop ever more convenient user experience (UX), but the mobile devices for terminals with a strict  requirement remain in its infancy, just providing basic information. This is because not much effort has been put into figuring out how information could be effectively delivered to users, while the erstwhile focus has stayed on distribution and application of the system. Lately, however, we have witnessed in the mobile devices for container terminals a trend for upgrading user convenience based on UX.
 
 

Enhanced UX as demonstrated in CyberLogitec’s selection as IDEA Finalist

Recently, CyberLogitec, which specializes in TOS and terminal automation, was selected as a finalist with its VMT (Vehicle Mounted Terminal) User Interface designed for Eagle Eye and submitted to IDEA, one of the world’s major design awards. The design was highly appreciated for its improved UI, which, unlike the text delivery for conventional terminals, ensures intuitive delivery of needed information with the help of graphic. As mobile devices for container terminals in turn set great store by design and user experience, UX design is about to open up an era of UX design for terminals.
Eagle Eye VMT, CyberLogitec's Selection as IDEA Finalist

Eagle Eye VMT, CyberLogitec’s Selection as an IDEA Finalist



Eagle Eye VMT, a Mobile Device for Terminals with Enhanced UX

Eagle Eye VMT, CyberLogitec’s Selection as an IDEA Finalist

 

Posted by Ho-Seok Lee, a general manger, who has developed business plans and sales strategy in technology business. Be sure to follow me on Linkedin.

 

Have something to say about mobile devices for container terminal operation? Leave a comment below or go to Contact Us page. We’ll get back to you as soon as we can.